The 3 Most Pressing Dilemmas of the Awakened Mind

Short foreword for this article: What is most misunderstood is the state of flow, what means that all informations pass and you will recognize them. But guess right not in old mind thought method, in flow you recognize them and can pick up what’s from interest. So here is an article about the change time, when you cannot let go the thinking mind to try processing all the stuff. It cannot, because the amount of data is somewhat huge and pass in zero time. Knowing is impressive different from the thinking model, that is limited in all angles and primary problem to mangle creator gods into slaves.

Informations will come over you in block methods, same like telepathy channel blocks of information to you. If someone channels an entity, he / she will write or speak the information blocks. That’s why there is no ehm inside, it’s a constant flow with buffer. What’s all incompatible to a 40 bit thinking process in words.

http://www.theeventchronicle.com/metaphysics/spiritual/3-pressing-dilemmas-awakened-mind/#

 
 

By Dylan Charles

It used to be easy to hold hostage the consciousness of humankind. The information which wove together societies was monolithic, disseminated by church and state. Understanding the world beyond one’s personal sphere of experience was limited to the assimilation of those perspectives. While evolutionary progress was slow in that paradigm, over time, small advances grew into sweeping changes, and the future is now upon us.

Today, we are wide awake in the age of atomization. A time when knowledge, wisdom, truth, trust, hope and faith have splintered into an infinite sea of preferences, all instantly available to all. An awakening has already happened, but now we’re confronted with the great challenge of deciding what to do with it.

Because of this, the awakened mind is not necessarily a mind at ease, nor at peace. This quandary is more unsettling than that of the sleepwalker. Shallow forms of bliss just won’t do, but now free of the bondage of ignorance, we are lost in opportunity, drowning in unrealized potential.

In the journey from asleep to awake we were possessed by a need for information, for light shone on darkness, but this phase must come to an end, lest our evolution stalls. We have to somehow go from awakened to actualized, along the way facing a new set of emergent challenges.

These puzzles are the pitfalls in our search for meaning in an evermore intensifying environment. Each of the three dilemmas noted below hinge upon the other two; they are not independent of one another. There exists a natural synergy and symbiosis between them, which must be honored. The decisions we make in each of these arenas will determine which paths become open to us in the other arenas.

For your consideration, what follows are the three most pressing dilemmas of the awakened mind.

1.) What do we choose to include in our awareness?

In very practical terms, when immersed in such total information awareness, as we are today, we must consciously or unconsciously choose what information and which ideas to consume. The choices span the entire spectrum of human possibility, from the darkest blackness of the human soul to the most shimmering golden light of infinite consciousness. We are exposed to all ranges of vibration. Choose we must.

There is a paradox at play here, though. In large part, the information which jolted us out of contemporary consciousness is fundamentally of lower vibration. It had to be that way. Total seriousness and gravity were required to brutally force our eyes open, to wake us up.

But continuing to feed on the darkness only draws us into a different trap. We can be wide awake while helplessly drowning in the abyss of base-level consciousness. As tantalizing and sensational as it is, this level of consciousness is heavy, always working to pull us under.

 

How much violence, brutality, murder, inhumanity and psychopathy can we look at? How much spiritual pornography can we safely consume? How long can we simmer in the mainline narratives before all progress is lost and we find ourselves stuck in yet another cage?

2.) How will we choose to communicate our awareness?

Just a short time ago, loneliness was the dilemma of the awakening mind. Yet now, so many are awake to some degree. With technology has come such tremendous freedom of communication, but it’s too much to process. To survive we take shelter on islands of comprehension, stranding ourselves with others of identical perspective. We are splintering into tribes rather than uniting as a cohesive human family.

In such a cacophony of competing voices, opinions and perspectives, all of which lay claim to the high ground of the awakened, we are confronted with the dilemma of how we share our perspectives and how we translate those of others. Do we insist that our understanding is final, and demand assimilation? Do we assume certainty and put on a confidence game of defending the information we like best? Do we get dogmatic, insisting that our truth is the only acceptable truth? Do we bludgeon others with self-righteousness?

Now that we know what we know, we have the choice of becoming repeaters of information, or craftsmen of a new story.

3.) What action will we take to honor this awareness?

Choosing to remain stuck in an endless spiral of negative information paralyses is a form of self-imposed psychosis. Nothing is gained if the awakened mind maroons itself on the island of perpetual study and looping examination.

This is resistance to the act of doing what is needed to experience the ideals which have motivated and inspired the awakening. At some point it becomes imperative to declare ourselves aware enough already, then find ways to take action toward the fulfillment of a purpose grander than the task of waking up.

There is infinite possibility in what actions an individual can take to accelerate the drive towards actualization, in both personal and communal terms. Any push toward action, though, great or meager, is honorable, for the body just needs to be set in motion, so it can stay in motion and then gain momentum.

To honor the progress we’ve made in exposing our condition it’s now necessary to accept the call to action. It’s time to actually create the world we wish to see manifest.

Final Thoughts

We find ourselves at the outer limits of the awakening. Can we exploit the momentum we’ve created which has gotten us this far, or will we return to the cave of delusion we came from? Choices.

Dylan Charles is a student and teacher of Shaolin Kung Fu, Tai Chi and Qi Gong, a practitioner of Yoga and Taoist arts, and an activist and idealist passionately engaged in the struggle for a more sustainable and just world for future generations. He is the editor of WakingTimes.com, the proprietor of OffgridOutpost.com, a grateful father and a man who seeks to enlighten others with the power of inspiring information and action. He may be contacted at wakingtimes@gmail.com.

 

This article (The 3 Most Pressing Dilemmas of the Awakened Mind) was originally published on Waking Times and syndicated by The Event Chronicle.

 

http://www.theeventchronicle.com/metaphysics/spiritual/3-pressing-dilemmas-awakened-mind/#

 

Carbon copy A.I.

The Westworld series has shown us a world with A.I. robots servings humans struggle and aggression for money. But who really has followed the storyline, had heard the method they gave the machines trauma, emotional stress to weird behavior. They did the same like the Annunaki to humans, to give us higher functions and a trick to shut the most of these functions down for better control reasons.

The placed a routine that speak their thoughts in own voice into the head. A consciousness limiter that pick up fragments of the whole and re-insert it as feedback loop and limiter. What will they place into the car A.I. that will drive your car?

Art as reflection of insanity?

This picture is part of a scene in the Hostel movie (2005), where a dark priest take a bath in blood under the victim hanging on the feet. It’s as official art painted on a house in Brussels, it reflects the consciousness of the people who elect leaders that praise this as art. It reflects further the installed mind control, that made the wall painting invisible for the people living around. Same with people in the esoteric religion, who only want to see and think about love and light.

 

Top Silicon Valley Exec Developing Telepathic Mind Control Technology

As MK-Ultra exist since the 50s, something like that is slightly a must in in technical evolution. Will people buy it? Do you know a technology that was not weaponized against the people before?

http://www.activistpost.com/2017/07/telepathic-mind-control-technology.html

By Aaron Kesel

A former Google[x] exec Mary Lou Jepsen wants to bring telepathy to your list of technological needs, accomplishing this feat through a simple ski-hat.

“I figured out how to put basically the functionality of an M.R.I. machine — a multimillion-dollar M.R.I. machine — into a wearable in the form of a ski hat,” Jepson told CNBC.

So how does she hope to achieve this and is it possible?

Current M.R.I. technology can already see your thoughts: “If I threw you into an M.R.I. machine right now … I can tell you what words you’re about to say, what images are in your head. I can tell you what music you’re thinking of,” Jepsen said. “That’s today, and I’m talking about just shrinking that down,” she added.

 

For years, this type of technology has been successfully tested starting with the CIA testing electrodes to read thoughts during MKUltra, the “Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research Lab” or PEAR for short and MIT.

From 1953 to 1973, the CIA was involved with all sorts of projects including — mind control, and reading, remote viewing and other experiments allegedly to target the Soviets and politicians. However, the experiments were done on non-consenting test subjects. And the official number of those tested is unknown since CIA Director Richard Helms destroyed all the records pertaining to the project.

Fifty some odd years later the black budget technology is coming out for public consumption in the clear world. Already, there are remote-controlled drones which are driven and robots that move their arms with the thoughts of your mind. The Chinese have tested using this technology for controlling robots for their soldiers and the list goes on and on, this isn’t new.

Jepsen isn’t the only Silicon valley technocrat trying to push mind reading technology.

Earlier this year, Elon Musk launched Neuralink, a company with a transhumanist agenda whose aim is to merge our brains with computers.

“Elon Musk is talking about silicon nanoparticles pulsing through our veins to make us sort of semi-cyborg computers,” Jepsen said. But why not take a noninvasive approach? “I’ve been working and trying to think and invent a way to do this for a number of years and finally happened upon it and left Facebook to do it,” Jepsen continues.

Still, even though Jepsen says it’s “noninvasive,” after her former company Google has been accused of privacy violations time and time again including handing information to the NSA, one can only trust her word so much.

The scary thing is that sending an image inside someone’s head to another person was proven by a Harvard University scientist in 2014 who sent a message from India to France.

But what’s even scarier is that this could be used by government authorities to create an Orwellian Society like that out of George Orwell’s 1984 where we create thought crimes.

As Truthstream media’s Melissa Dykes said last year during the Davos meeting, elite were talking about implementing brain decoding technology without your consent into the legal system.

Technology is about to openly bring us an era where government authorities can read people’s minds without their permission and use it against them including in court, pre-crime, thought police/thought crime and labeling people including children as potential criminals based on their brainwaves.

It’s not a matter of will this technology be abused, it’s a matter of when it will be abused. Everyone deserves their own safe space inside their head free from outside criticism. Not to mention implementing a technology like this where hackers will seek to exploit the technology creating a dangerous situation for the users who knows what is capable. We are literally moving into The Matrix or  Minority Report.

Aaron Kesel writes for Activist Post. Follow us at Twitter and Steemit. This article is Creative Commons and can be republished in full with attribution.

Also Read: Neural “Smart” Dust Connects Brain and Computer (Wireless Mind Control)

Image Credit: Truthstream Media

http://www.activistpost.com/2017/07/telepathic-mind-control-technology.html

 

Esoteric Bubbles

Primary difference between esoteric and lived spirituality is result and effect. While esoteric is part of CIA and church placed minded concepts to imprison people even deeper in mind bubbles, a lived spirituality is more than real. It shift and transform the practitioner within time and without getting lost in mind bubbles.

Esoteric is part of the big money machine, to make people feel happy when buying plastic Buddhas and utilities to fumigate. Listening for life spans to expensive gurus without any effect, reading enlightened text to feel warmth for few minutes. Most of you know that esoteric feels more cozy, because it was created by masterminds to serve mind bubbles. Like having sport for 30 minutes per week and eating chips on couch in front of the telly the other time.

Hard facts to transform yourself do likely not look cozy for minds, as it is not understandable that few adjustments in your life end up in profound change. That also result in uprise of famous web pages with esoteric stuff and their shutdown because of no one experience real change at all. To locate real solutions and answers require to look apart from mind, to go different ways, to loose friends who dislike the new being that has awaken from the dream. So take care for placed esoteric, that screw you even deeper in the matrix and empty your pockets.

For the mind this is a rant, because mind avoid to reflect it’s own wrong behavior.

How to Calm Your Mind Without Sitting to Meditate

A calm mind is key for a clear connection to other realms than 3D. So there a several methods to reach this, to step out 3D every time you have no need to run this modus. A calm mind is key to be present, to be available and not distracted with 100% attention to the mental noise. So here is another way to reach inner silence, a state that the most people see as surreal, because their mind tell it that way to keep it’s power position.

http://www.riseearth.com/2017/05/how-to-calm-your-mind-without-sitting.html

 

 

 

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by Bill Lee; tiny buddha

“Our way to practice is one step at a time, one breath at a time.” ~Shunryu Suzuki

Sitting meditation has always been challenging for me; practicing mindfulness, even harder.

As a self-confessed worrywart who has contended with constant ruminations, flashbacks, and nightmares for most of my life (more on this later), all prior attempts at being fully present and not thinking merely served as reminders of how little control I had over my mind. Then I took up hiking and stumbled upon a form of meditation that literally transformed my life.

Initially, just being out in nature on scenic trails cultivated calmness and cleared my head. Almost immediately, I realized that hiking provided a respite from intrusive thoughts that have plagued me since I was a tyke.

They include flashbacks of my mother’s numerous suicide attempts in our decrepit Chinatown apartment, my father’s drunken rages, and recurring images of shootings, savage beatings, and other gory crime scenes from my gangbanging days.

Ruminations include the sound of gunfire along with the replaying in my head of toxic utterances in Cantonese that translate to “Giving birth to you was my biggest mistake,” “I wish you were never born,” and my own father yelling “You bastard!”

Somehow, walking in nature enabled my mind to slow down and rest, which felt liberating.

Unfortunately, the novelty soon wore out. Merely walking and hiking wasn’t enough to prevent symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress from returning. I reverted to rehashing the past and worrying obsessively about the future.

However, I had gotten a taste of the benefits of mindfulness meditation and discovered that it can be practiced while engaging in an activity I enjoyed. These revelations motivated me to keep at it.

After reading what was available on walking meditation, which typically advise focusing on the flow of our “in” and “out” breaths, I developed my own techniques for practicing mindful walking and hiking.

My favorite is to look ahead and select a destination point or object and stay focused on it. It can be a shadow on the ground, boulder, bush, tree, manhole cover, light pole, store awning, mailbox, and so on. Once I reached it, I chose another landmark or object, usually a little further away.

Rough or uneven trails forced me to concentrate on each step for safety reasons. My brain automatically blocked out discursive thoughts; otherwise I could slip, trip, or fall. Other techniques I came up with include fully feeling the ground of each step, following the flight pattern of birds and insects, observing cloud patterns, and being conscious of sounds and scents—moment to moment.

Zen monk Thich Nhat Hanh, often called “Thay,” which means “teacher” in Vietnamese, is revered throughout the world for his teachings and writings on mindfulness and peace.

He has brought the practice into institutions, including maximum-security prisons, helping inmates attain calmness and inner peace while being confined up to twenty-four hours daily. Many of them have professed that mindfulness meditation is the most difficult endeavor they have ever engaged in.

We live in a culture where many of us want quick results with as little effort as possible. This applies to how we approach our work, health, pastimes, social interactions, and problems. This mindset is the antithesis of mindfulness.

In my opinion, it is virtually impossible to tackle mindfulness meditation without patience and discipline. Fortunately, these attributes can be enhanced by engaging in the art itself.

When I started mindful walking and hiking, my ability to stay present was measured in feet and seconds.

As a highly competitive, emotionally undisciplined, and impatient person, I could have easily succumbed to my frustrations and given up. But the short periods of calmness and inner peace I attained—supplemented by my stubbornness—provided the necessary resolve for me to stick with the program.

As I continued my mindfulness “training,” catching my mind when it wandered occurred sooner, and the ability to refocus took less effort. Using kind, positive messages such as “rest” and “focus” was more effective than phrases such as “don’t wander” and “don’t think.”

Insight and mindfulness meditation are usually practiced separately. Personally, when I am procrastinating about something or seeking a solution to a problem, ideas and answers usually emerge effortlessly during or immediately following my walks and hikes.

These epiphanies and aha moments tend to be inspired by kindness and compassion, as opposed to ego.

I was severely beaten by a rival gang member as a teen. For over forty years, I suffered nightmares, flashbacks, and ruminations of the attack. Both conventional and unconventional modalities of therapy failed to provide much relief.

One morning, I was enjoying a relaxing hike when the familiar image of my attacker suddenly appeared. For the very first time, I remained calm and found myself viewing my lifelong enemy as a kindred spirit. I saw him as someone like me, most likely abused as a child, who desperately sought empowerment by joining gangs.

This awakening, along with my spiritual practice, enabled me to cultivate compassion and forgiveness. The nightmares and flashes of the attack ceased at that point and have not returned.

Mindfulness can be practiced pretty much anywhere and at any time. I do it first thing in the morning when I wake up while still lying in bed, in the kitchen, in the shower, at my desk, and most recently while getting dental work done.

Whether I devote a few seconds by pausing and taking a deep belly breath—or hiking for several hours—benefits are reaped.

As I mentioned at the beginning of this post, practicing mindfulness has transformed my life. With a family history of mental illness and a violent upbringing, I have been diagnosed and treated for multiple mood disorders, including manic depression, post-traumatic stress, addiction, and rage.

My mindfulness practice has empowered me to rest and calm my mind, as well as intercept and suppress negative thoughts. It serves as a powerful coping mechanism for me.

For the majority of my life, I was at the mercy of gambling urges and other cravings. When I encounter them now, I pause, acknowledge what is happening, take a few deep breaths, focus on my surroundings, and allow the urges to pass.

Staying relaxed enables me to respond instead of react, which places me in a better position to reflect and gain insight into the underlying issues that triggered the desire to self-medicate.

My mood is much more stable and I have better control of my emotions. The benefits I received from mindful walking and hiking has inspired me to practice it throughout the day.

I used to loathe driving because of my road rage. I was terrified of myself, often wondering when I left the house if I would end up in jail or the morgue. My level of stress rose in proportion to the amount of traffic I encountered.

Practicing mindfulness meditation in the car keeps me mellow as well as alert. I have become a patient and compassionate driver, smiling at other motorists and limiting use of the horn for safety purposes. Another insight I gained is that my past aggressive behavior on and off the road attracted like-minded people.

The mental discipline I gained also enabled me to embrace Buddhism, which has interested, yet eluded me for many years. All of this empowers me to attain and maintain equanimity. Now, I can even sit and meditate for long periods without feeling restless or irritable.

So for those who find sitting meditation challenging, or for individuals seeking different ways to practice mindfulness, I recommend mindful walking and hiking.

Not only is it a fun way to quiet the mind while getting some exercise, but it can be life-changing—helping us let go of worries, stress, tension, and even the most painful memories from the past.

http://www.riseearth.com/2017/05/how-to-calm-your-mind-without-sitting.html